American Practical Navigator

Εξώφυλλο
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1880
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Περιεχόμενα

Examples in geography 31
48
ARRANGEMENT OF THE TABLES Tablo Page Difference of latitude and departure for points 1
52
Questions to exercise the learner in plane sailing
58
A table showing how many miles of meridian distance correspond to a degree or longi
64
Table of solutions of the various cases of Mercators sailing
79
To work a compound course by middle latitude or Mercators sailing
87
To find the difference between the true and apparent directions of the wind
97
Gauging
103
To survey a coast in sailing along shore
109
To reduce soundings taken at any time of the tide to low water
115
Tides
120
Of the logline and halfminute glass 126
126
Description and use of a sextant of reflection
133
Verification of the mirrors and colored glasses
137
Verification of the mirrors and colored glasses
143
To observe the transit of any heavenly body over the meridian
150
To find the distance of the land in order to calculate the dip
155
To calculate the true azimuth
160
To find the latitude by a meridian altitude of the sun or a fixed star
166
To find the latilude by the moons meridian altitude
171
To find the latitude by double altitudes of the moon
178
Second method
185
Questions to exercise the learner in working double altitudes
191
Fifth method to find the latitude from altitudes and distances used in taking a lunar
197
To find the latitude by the mean of several altitudes of the sun taken near noon by
204
Esamples to exercise the learner in finding the mean tinie
210
To find the apparent time by an altitude of a fixed star
217
To find the longitude at sea by lunar observations
225
Table of corrections for second differences
245
Method of coinbining several lunar observations and determining the error of the chro
251
To allow for the change of rate in a chronometer
259
Journa from Boston to Madeira
270
Difference for degrees 17
17
Meridional parts 62
62
Suns declination 68
68
To find the correction and logarithm of a lunar observation when the sun is used 97
97
To find the correction and logarithm of a lunar observation depending on the moons altitude 98
98
For finding the third correction of a lunar observation 130
130
For turning degrees and minutes into time and the contrary 131
131
Proportional logarithms 132
132
For finding the latitude by two altitudes of the sun 148
148
Natural sines and cosines 160
160
Log sines tangents c to points and quarter points 169
169
Logarithmic sines tangents and secants 185
185
To find the time of the moons passing the meridian 230
230
To find the variation of the moons declination c 231
231
To find the suns right ascension 237
237
Variation of the suns altitude in one minute from noon 238
238
To reduce the numbers of Table XXXII to other given intervals froin noon 243
243
Errors arising from a deviation of one minute in the parallelism of the surfaces of the central mirror 244
244
Longitudes and latitudes of the fixed stars 245
245
Reductions of latitude and horizontal parallax 246
246
Aberration of the fixed stars in right ascension and declination 247
247
Nutation in right ascension and declination 248
248
Augmentation of the moons semidiameter found by the nonagesimal 249
249
Third correction in Lyonss improved method 273
273
Correction for a planet whose horizontal parallax is 351
328
Honduras
337
Oregon
361
APO BANK
369
CATALOGUE OF THE Tables with examples of the uses of those not explained in other
385
Addition and subtraction using the signs as in algebra 3 95
395
To find the altitude and longitude of the nonagesimal
402
To calculate the longitude of a place from the observed beginning
410
To calculate an eclipse of the sun
417
To calculate the beginning or end of an eclipse or occultation
425
Given the latitude of the moon and longitude of the moon and sun
433
Theorems in spherics
439
Redfields theory of storms c
447
To find the longitude of a place from tise beginning or end of an
468

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Δημοφιλή αποσπάσματα

Σελίδα 9 - The angle in a semicircle is a right angle ; the angle in a segment greater than a semicircle is less than a right angle ; and the angle in a segment less than a semicircle is greater than a right angle.
Σελίδα 13 - In any plane triangle, as the sum of the sides about the vertical angle is to their difference, so is the tangent of half the sum of the angles at the base to the tangent of half their difference.
Σελίδα 13 - In any plane triangle, the sum of any two sides is to their difference as the tangent of half the sum of the opposite angles is to the tangent of half their difference. By Theorem II. we have a : b : : sin. A : sin. B.
Σελίδα 4 - A plane rectilineal angle is the inclination of two straight lines to one another, which meet together, but are not in the same straight line.
Σελίδα 250 - Emersion (Em.) the instant of its reappearance at coming out of the shadow. They generally happen when the Satellite is apparently at some distance from the body of Jupiter, except near the opposition of Jupiter to the Sun, when the eclipse takes place near to the body of the planet.
Σελίδα 5 - In a right triangle, the side opposite the right angle is called the hypotenuse, and the other two sides the legs.
Σελίδα 229 - ... distance, to obtain the approximate Greenwich mean time corresponding to the given distance. If the distance between the Moon and a Star increased or decreased uniformly, the Greenwich...
Σελίδα 122 - ... to the depth of 80 or 100 fathoms ; then heave the log, and the number of knots run out in half a minute will be the miles the current sets per hour, and the bearing of the log will show the set of it. There is a very remarkable current, called the GULF STREAM, which sets in a north-east direction along the coast of America, from Cape Florida towards the Isle of Sables...
Σελίδα 144 - ... placed by the maker equidistant from each other and parallel to the middle one — therefore, when the middle one is adjusted, the others are so too ; he also places the two transverse wires at right angles to the vertical middle wire. These adjustments are always performed by the maker, and but little liable to derangement. When, however, they happen to get out of order, and the observer wishes to correct them, it is done by loosening the screws which hold the eye-end of the telescope in its...
Σελίδα 133 - ... to make the objects appear on the other wire ; if the contact still remains perfect, the axis of the telescope is in proper adjustment ; if not, it must be altered by moving the two screws which fasten, to the up-and-down piece, the collar into which the telescope screws. This adjustment is not very liable to be deranged.

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