School Architecture: Or, Contributions to the Improvement of School-houses in the United States

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A. S. Barnes & Company, 1849 - 383 σελίδες
 

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Σελίδα 152 - ... and it is further ordered, that where any town shall increase to the number of one hundred families or householders they shall set up a grammar school, the master thereof being able to instruct youth so far as they may be fitted for the university...
Σελίδα 21 - School-masier,' by Mr. George B. Emerson ; gentlemen to whom, for their efforts in the cause, a large debt of gratitude is due from the friends of education ; a debt which can be discharged in no manner more acceptable to them, than by entering into their labors, and adopting and reducing to practice their very valuable suggestions." RHODE ISLAND. EXTRACTS from "Report on the condition and improvement of the Public Schools of Rhode Island, submitted Nov. 1, 1845, by Henry Barnard. Commissioner of...
Σελίδα 110 - In 1827, Mr. Spencer, from the same Committee, reported a bill entitled ' An act to provide permanent funds for the annual appropriation to common schools, to increase the Literature Fund, and to promote the education of teachers,' by which the sum of $150,000 was added to the Literature Fund.
Σελίδα 115 - ... for the instruction and practice of teachers of common schools in the science of education and in the art of teaching, to be located in the county of Albany.
Σελίδα 116 - ... intend to remain in the school until they graduate. ENTRANCE. All the pupils, on entering the school, are required to sign the following declaration: ' We the subscribers hereby DECLARE, that it is our intention to devote ourselves to the business of teaching: district schools, and that our sole object in resorting to this Normal School is the better to prepare ourselves for that important duty.
Σελίδα 110 - ... in proportion to the number of pupils instructed in each. academy or seminary for six months during the preceding year, who shall have pursued classical studies, or the higher branches of English education, or both.
Σελίδα 111 - We have no right to trifle with the funds of our constituents, by applying them in a mode which fails to attain the intended object. Competent teachers of Common Schools must be provided ; the academies of the State furnish the means of making that provision. There are funds which may be safely and properly applied to that object; and if there were none, a more just, patriotic, and, in its true sense, popular reason for taxation cannot be urged. Let us aid the efforts of meritorious citizens, who...
Σελίδα 218 - The earlier we can establish, in every populous district, primary schools, under female teachers, whose hearts are made strong by deep religious principle, who have faith in the power of Christian love steadily exerted to fashion anew the bad manners, and soften the harsh and self-willed perverseness of neglected children, with patience to begin every morning, with but little if any perceptible advance beyond where they began the previous morning, with prompt and kind sympathies, and ready skill...
Σελίδα 109 - ... that our expanding population requires constant accessions to their numbers, and that to realize these views, it is necessary that some new plan for obtaining able teachers, should be devised; I therefore recommend a seminary for the education of teachers in the monitorial system of instruction, and in those useful branches of knowledge which are proper to engraft on elementary attainments. A compliance with this recommendation will have the most benign influence on individual happiness and social...
Σελίδα 152 - It was then generally agreed upon, that our brother Philemon Purmont shall be instructed to become schoolmaster for the teaching and nurturing of children with us.

Σχετικά με τον συγγραφέα (1849)

Born in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1811, Henry Barnard was educated at Yale University. Barnard supported legislation to provide for better schools in Connecticut and, in doing so, he followed the reforms initiated in Massachusetts by Horace Mann. Barnard later instituted educational reforms in Rhode Island where he started several school libraries. After various academic appointments, including one as president of St. John's College in Annapolis, Maryland, Barnard became the first U.S. commissioner of education (1867-70). In this position, he was influential in shaping the future direction of the U.S. Office of Education. He initiated numerous reforms and promoted the importance of education in general through federally sponsored experimentation, research, and scholarship and the collection and dissemination of educational statistics and information. Barnard's emphasis on a need to create common school districts throughout the United States was based on his strong belief in public education and the notion that schools should foster moral education and temper social unrest. In addition to his books, which cover a wide range of educational issues and concerns, Barnard was the founder and editor of a widely read journal, The American Journal of Education (1855-82).

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