Essay on Instinct, and Its Physical and Moral Relations

Εξώφυλλο
W. Phillips, 1824 - 551 σελίδες
"A concise view of the following argument on instinct and its physical and moral relations was originally community about two years ago. A request was soon made that it might be given to the public. In surveying the diversified classes of phenomena, which are presented to the view in the wide field of Natural History, none appear more interesting than the acts of the Brute creation. It is natural therefore to compare these acts, which have generally been supposed to result from a peculiar principle, named Instinct, with the operations of Human Reason. In so far as illustrations from Natural History were necessary to my purpose, I have not scrupled to avail myself freely of the scientific labours of others--I trust, however, with proper acknowledgments. And, though I consider the speculations in the First Part (physical relations of instinct) as but secondary and introductory to those in the Second (moral relations of instinct), I am aware, that there is a class of readers who will give them the preference. I have therefore studied to make the former more interesting to this class, by a greater number of quotations than I should have otherwise thought necessary"--Book. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
 

Τι λένε οι χρήστες - Σύνταξη κριτικής

Δεν εντοπίσαμε κριτικές στις συνήθεις τοποθεσίες.

Άλλες εκδόσεις - Προβολή όλων

Συχνά εμφανιζόμενοι όροι και φράσεις

Δημοφιλή αποσπάσματα

Σελίδα 470 - Let no man deceive himself . If any man among you seemeth to be wise in this world, let him become a fool, that he may be wise.
Σελίδα 471 - Who is a wise man and endued with knowledge among you ? let him shew out of a good conversation his works with meekness of wisdom.
Σελίδα xii - Knowledge and wisdom, far from being one, Have ofttimes no connection. Knowledge dwells In heads replete with thoughts of other men, Wisdom in minds attentive to their own.
Σελίδα 454 - For every one that useth milk is unskilful in the word of righteousness : for he is a babe. But strong meat belongeth to them that are of full age, even those who by reason of use have their senses exercised to discern both good and evil.
Σελίδα 470 - And I, brethren, when I came to you, came not with excellency of speech or of wisdom, declaring unto you the testimony of God, for I determined not to know any thing among you, save Jesus Christ, and him crucified.
Σελίδα 536 - Not a flower But shows some touch, in freckle, streak, or stain, Of his unrivalled pencil, He' inspires Their balmy odours, and imparts their hues, And bathes their eyes with nectar, and includes, In grains as countless as the sea-side sands, The forms, with which he sprinkles all the earth.
Σελίδα 248 - Let us then suppose the mind to be, as we say, white paper, void of all characters, without any ideas; how comes it to be furnished? Whence comes it by that vast store, which the busy and boundless fancy of man has painted on it with an almost endless variety? Whence has it all the materials of reason and knowledge? To this I answer, in one word, from EXPERIENCE...
Σελίδα 156 - Who taught the nations of the field and wood To shun their poison, and to choose their food ? Prescient, the tides or tempests to withstand, Build on the wave, or arch beneath the sand?
Σελίδα 184 - Some drill and bore The solid earth, and from the strata there Extract a register, by which we learn That he who made it, and reveal'd its date To Moses, was mistaken in its age.
Σελίδα 503 - Reason is natural revelation, whereby the eternal Father of light, and Fountain of all knowledge, communicates to mankind that portion of truth which he has laid within the reach of their natural faculties. Revelation is natural reason enlarged by a new set of discoveries, communicated by God immediately, which reason vouches the truth of, by the testimony and proofs it gives, that they come from God.

Πληροφορίες βιβλιογραφίας