Commentaries on the Laws of England: In Four Books, Τόμος 1

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Σελίδα 210 - It was moved that King James the Second, having endeavoured to subvert the constitution of the kingdom by breaking the original contract between King and people, and, by the advice of Jesuits and other wicked persons, having violated the fundamental laws, and having withdrawn himself out of the kingdom, had abdicated the government, and that the throne had thereby become vacant.
Σελίδα 411 - That the raising or keeping a standing army within the kingdom in time of peace, unless it be with consent of parliament, is against law.
Σελίδα 3 - ... freedom of men under government is to have a standing rule to live by, common to every one of that society and made by the legislative power erected in it, a liberty to follow my own will in all things where the rule prescribes not, and not to be subject to the inconstant, uncertain, unknown, arbitrary will of another man; as freedom of nature is to be under no other restraint but the law of nature.
Σελίδα 360 - ... the division where any person or persons that are likely to be chargeable to the parish shall come to inhabit, by their warrant to remove and convey such person or persons to such parish where he or they were last legally settled, either as a native, householder, sojourner, apprentice or servant, for the space of forty days at the least...
Σελίδα 134 - J expressly direct, that no man shall be taken or imprisoned by suggestion or petition to the king or his council, unless it be by legal indictment, or the process of the common law. By the petition of right, 3 Car.
Σελίδα 434 - For this reason, a man cannot grant anything to his wife, or enter into covenant with her: for the grant would be to suppose her separate existence; and to covenant with her, would be only to covenant with himself...
Σελίδα 155 - Thus, every branch of our civil polity supports and is supported, regulates and is regulated, by the rest ; for the two houses, naturally drawing in two directions of opposite interest, and the prerogative in another still different from them both, they mutually keep each other from exceeding their proper limits ; while the whole is prevented from separation, and artificially connected together, by the mixed nature of the crown, which is a part of the legislative, and the sole executive magistrate.
Σελίδα 111 - That in case the crown and imperial dignity of this realm shall hereafter come to any person not being a native of this kingdom of England this nation be not obliged to engage in any war for the defence of any dominions or territories which do not belong to the crown of England without the consent of Parliament.
Σελίδα 109 - Britain; and that the King's Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords spiritual and temporal and Commons of Great Britain in Parliament assembled, had, hath and of right ought to have, full power and authority to make laws and statutes of sufficient force and validity to bind the colonies and people of America, subjects of the Crown of Great Britain in all cases whatsoever.
Σελίδα 124 - This natural liberty consists properly in a power of acting as one thinks fit, without any restraint or control, unless by the law of nature;' being a right inherent in us by birth, and one of the gifts of God to man at his creation, when he endued him with the faculty of free will.

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